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Daddy [Melbourne]




Daddy  [Melbourne]

Ticketing Information

AUSLAN-INTERPRETED SHOW


Date/Time:

Sunday May 12, 2019 - 6:30 PM

Location:

Arts House North Melbourne Town Hall
521 Queensberry Street
North Melbourne, VIC 3051
Australia

Tickets:

See link for details

Interpreter:

Rebecca White & Amber Richardson

Language/ Cultural Consultant:

Website:

https://www.artshouse.com.au/events/daddy/



About the Show

Joel has daddy issues.

And his insatiable cravings for father figures always leave him wanting more.

Don’t tell his dentist, but Joel Bray’s cravings are getting out of hand. He’s looking to live the sweet life, yet the sugar hits of nostalgia and fantasy are all too short-lived, and behind it all there’s a need that can never be sated.

Daddy is the latest work from one of the most electric new figures in Australian dance. Here he probes one of the paradoxes of our age: when so much is on offer, why are we left so hungry?

From the sugar-coated idyll of childhood reminiscence to the glazed excesses of queer adulthood, Joel’s story proves that a sweet tooth is a dangerous thing. Short-lived highs give way to the inevitable comedowns before the cycle begins all over again. And like a kid in a candy store, an imperial hunger for Aboriginal Australia consumes all it encounters – land, women and children – like fistfuls of sugar.

Hilarious, provocative and heartfelt, this world premiere tickles the nerve endings of desire while prodding the cavities left by colonisation. Featuring Joel Bray’s trademark confection of conversation, dance and all-you-can-eat audience participation, Daddy is a sweet feast with a deadly aftertaste.

“A fraught, voyeuristic intention that is difficult to watch, but impossible to turn away from.” Stage Whispers for Biladurang

“Bray’s Dharawungara also plays with dynamic shifts, as he draws the audience into his story with humour and pathos.” Sydney Morning Herald for Dharawungara

 “What’s undeniable is how moving this performance is, in ways that you don’t expect: it’s sharp, unsettling, urgent. It’s both a personal rite of expiation and empowerment, and a mourning for the immeasurable losses of colonial dispossession.” Witness Performance for Dharawungara